News is a conversation?

Or at least that’s what Briggs tells us.

“The speed of communications is wonderful to behold.
It is also true that speed can multiply the distribution of
information that we know to be untrue.” – Edward R. Murrow

conversation

The man that said this passed away before the digital news even happened.
Now, this quote remains true.
One of the challenges that journalists now face is how to manage that conversation.
This chapter really looks at a couple questions:
1. How do journalists participate in the conversation without sacrificing objectivity?
2. What about legal and ethical issues now that everyone can publish anything they want?
3. What happens when you really want audiences to participate, but they don’t?

Now, moving on in the chapter, Briggs offers tips to make the conversation.
How do you do that?
-> Answer all questions
-> Address criticism
-> Publicly or privately respond
-> Share good responses
-> Publicly correct yourself
-> Always acknowledge news tips

I personally enjoy these tips. It may seem like common sense, but they are tips because there can be right and wrong ways to do things. There is no perfect way to do things, but there are things that may work better than others and this is one of those things. And the rate of growth for social networking sites makes it obvious how important these tips are.

He also advises to build a community online.
He says that the link is the first building block, then comes the comment or the contribution.
Journalists must get involved- by using their time, energy and resources.
Developing sources through the community is a perk of this commitment.
In the collaboration, journalists usually can provide the how and why when the network provides the what.
But the journalist must keep conversations accurate and ethical.  Briggs says to set guidelines for participants, monitor postings for offensive content, know your legal responsibilities and correct errors.

Overall, great chapter with alot of useful information.

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